In-House Projects & Publications

9 ways to put AI ethics int0 practice (Report) (11.11.20) | Editors: Raj Shekhar and Antara Vats

This document presents a collation of expert insights on creating and mandating ethical AI devices & applications — contributed by members of the AI Policy Exchange Editorial Network under the AI Policy Exchange Expert Vlogging Series 1.0: How to put AI ethics into practice? — for public appraisal.

AI Policy Exchange Expert Vlogging Series 1.0: How to put AI ethics into practice? (Online Discussion Series) (June – October 2020) | Concept, Coordination & Design: Raj Shekhar and Antara Vats

The AI Policy Exchange Expert Vlogging Series 1.0: How to put AI ethics into practice? aimed to facilitate public appraisal of various practicable propositions for creating and mandating ethical AI as they were earnestly put forth by several members of the AI Policy Exchange Editorial Network in the form of simple, insightful vlogs. These propositions for creating and mandating ethical AI ended up representing a diverse range of voices from amongst industry professionals, public policy researchers, and leaders of civil society groups within the AI community. 

Artificial Creations: Ascription, Ownership, Time-Specific Monopolies (Working Paper – arXiv) (02.10.20) | Author: Raj Shekhar

Creativity has always been synonymous with humans. No other living species could boast of creativity as humans could. Even the smartest computers thrived only on the ingenious imaginations of its coders. However, that is steadily changing with highly advanced artificially intelligent systems that demonstrate incredible capabilities to autonomously (i.e., with minimal or no human input) produce creative products that would ordinarily deserve intellectual property status if created by a human. These systems could be called artificial creators and their creative products artificial creations. The use of artificial creators is likely to become a part of mainstream production practices in the creative and innovation industries sooner than we realize. When they do, intellectual property regimes (that are inherently designed to reward human creativity) must be sufficiently prepared to aptly respond to the phenomenon of what could be called artificial creativity. Needless to say, any such response must be guided by considerations of public welfare. This paper analyzes what that response ought to look like by revisiting the determinants of intellectual property and critiquing its nature and modes. This understanding of intellectual property is then applied to investigate the determinants of intellectual property in artificial creations so as to determine the intrinsic justifications for intellectual property rewards for artificial creativity, and accordingly, develop general modalities for granting intellectual property status to artificial creations. Finally, the treatment of artificial works (i.e., copyrightable artificial creations) and artificial inventions (i.e., patentable artificial creations) by current intellectual property regimes is critiqued, and specific modalities for granting intellectual property status to artificial works and artificial inventions are developed.

Microtargeted political ads are not a threat to democracies, if designed and deployed ethically (Op-Ed – INDIAai, a joint initiative of Ministry of Electronics & Information Technology, Government of India, National e-Governance Division and NASSCOM) (28.10.20) | Author: Raj Shekhar

If MPAs in political campaigns are designed and deployed ethically, i.e., if MPAs could be mandated to refrain from attempts to undermine voter informational autonomy and corrupt voter judgment, they are likely to cease much of their threatening influence on democratic participation across the globe.

What’s Up With AI Ethics? (Living Document) (1st edition: 20.02.20) | Editor: Raj Shekhar

This document presents a collation of the ongoing academic research on ethical quandaries around the development, deployment and use of artificially intelligent technologies in easy-to-understand language to bridge the gap between academia and the public on the understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of AI ethics.